Toyota Tacoma Tire Sizes - Guide

Looking for a new set of tires for your Toyota Tacoma? Here is a guide on what tire sizes Toyota uses and just how big you can go.

Toyota Tacoma Tire Sizes

Looking to buy tires or put larger ones on your Toyota Tacoma. Check out this handy guide. 

Before running out to buy new tires, consider that Toyota used quite a few different sizes for Tacoma’s built between 1995 and 2013. Here is a chart showing the different rim sizes.

OEM Tire Sizes – Toyota Tacoma

Model Year Original Factory Tacoma Tire Sizes Sorted By Rim Size
1995-2000 195/75 R14 215/70 R14 225/75 R15 31×10.5 R15 265/70 R16
2001-2004 205/75 R15 225/75 R15 235/55 R16 265/70 R16
2005-2015 215/70 R15 245/75 R16 265/70 R16 265/65 R17 265/60 R18
2016-current 245/75 R16 265/70 R16 265/65 R17 265/60 R18


The above table shows the dramatic growth of tire and rim sizes over the years. This is primarily due to the changing world of compact trucks. While 14″ rims were common in the mid-90s, you would be hard-pressed to find a pickup with them now.

The BIG Question – How Large Of A Tire Will Fit?

One of the simplest “modifications” you can do is to put a larger tire on your truck. The Tacoma has a good amount of room in the wheel well and larger tires can fit without much issue. Just how big? Here are a few rules of thumb to remember:

1. 2005+ Tacoma Trucks. If you've got a Tacoma with the V6 and 245/75 R16 tires, you can pick any larger size on the list above. That's because they all have almost exactly the same diameter. They're just slightly wider.

2. The 3% Height and Width Rule. Generally, you can increase your tire's height and width by 3% each without having to install a lift or leveling kit. This translates into about 1″ of additional height and .3″ additional width. Most tire dealers call this the “plus 1” tire size increase. It is an affordable and reasonable option for modification without a large expense. There are also minimal negative side effects.

3. 1″ Lift Equals 1″ Tire Height. The general rule with regards to lift kits is that you can 1″ higher in tire for each inch of lift. So, if you decide to add a 3″ lift, you can add 3″ of tire height. Keep in mind, this DOESN’T apply to width. Adding width is all about buying wider rims with different backspacing.

However, there are some issues that may happen when going from a smaller tire to a larger diameter tire. Problems like:

  • Your truck’s speedometer and odometer won't be accurate. A larger tire often has a circumference 2%-3% greater than the stock tire. The speedometer/odometer will be off by the same percentage.  
  • Larger tires look cool, but you can lose low-end torque. The reality is that you are adding to the overall diameter of your drive wheel, which effectively reduces your rear axle ratio. This translates into slower acceleration. This is one of the reasons why many trucks with larger tires either have the differentials re-geared or have performance modifications. 

Over-Sized 2005+ Tacoma Tires

Note: These recommendations are based on the factory wheels. Using an upgraded rim with different backspacing will allow you to increase to a wider tire. Also, if you go really wide (more than 285), you will want to consider fender flares.

No Lift

Max tire sizes are:

15″ rims: 265/75 R15 – A 265/80 R15 tire would fit just fine, but no one makes one to our knowledge. 265/75 R15 is the largest available size.

16″ rims: 265/75 R16 – one inch taller but same width as factory

17″ rims: 265/70 R17 – one inch taller but same width as factory

18″ rims: 265/65 R18 – one inch taller but same width as factory


2″ Leveling Kit (or less)

When installing a leveling kit, you might be able to fit some wider tires than what we have listed. It may require some trimming though, but it is possible.

Max tire sizes are:

15″ rims: …if you’ve got 15’s and have invested in a lift kit, spend a little more and get some 16″ or 17″ wheels to go with it. There aren’t any good tire sizes for 15’s.

16″ rims: 265/75 R16 – one inch taller but same width as factory

17″ rims: 275/70 R17 – 1.5 inches taller and 0.4″ wider than factory

18″ rims: 275/65 R18  – 1.5 inches taller and 0.4″ wider than factory


2.5" - 3″ Lift Kit

Note: If you are planning a 2.5" - 3″ lift, you will need to consider either a new set of wheels or some wheel spacers. The fact is that there aren’t a lot of common tire sizes that take advantage of your lift AND still fit the stock rims.

After-market rims designed for the Tacoma allow you to increase the tire width to as large as 315mm (or about 12.5″). There are several things to be aware of if you really want 315's on your Tacoma:

  • You may need to trim the fenders and wheel wells due to tires rubbing at full lock or full articulation. This also applies if you have 1.5″ wheel spacers and stock wheels.
  • Many 315's will not fit on stock wheels because they are not wide enough. 
  • You will need to trim the forward cab mount, or it will run on 315's. The cab mount should be welded shut and rustproofed after trimming. This mod is not easily reversible and may impact the value of your truck if you want to trade it in. 
  • Re-gearing the differentials is pretty much required for 315's. If re-gearing isn't done, the truck will be very sluggish off the line, and an automatic transmission won't shift at the correct points for good performance. 
  • This tire size will cause the front wheel bearings to wear out prematurely. The bearing is over-stressed due to the increased weight and leverage (caused by increased offset).

A common Tacoma tire width for 2.5" - 3″ lift kits is 285mm. This means 17″ wheels, and 285/70 R17’s are a good choice (2″ taller and .8″ wider than factory). For 16″ wheels, 285/75 R16’s have similar dimensions as the 17″ wheels do. This tire size still causes some issues, but they are less dramatic than those caused by 315's:

  • You will need to trim the forward cab mount, or it will run on 285's. The cab mount should be welded shut and rustproofed after trimming. This mod is not easily reversible and may impact the value of your truck if you want to trade it in. 
  • The outer fenders will not need trimming. The inner fenders may need trimming. 
  • At lower altitudes, and depending on your driving style, you may not need to re-gear. The truck will feel sluggish off the line at higher altitudes. If you tow anything, you will want to re-gear. 

Buying Tires

Much like everything else these days, it is beneficial to shop around. Try online sites and your local dealer. Quite often you can find good estimates and have a better idea of the cost before you walk into a store.