Toyota Camry Power Window Failure - Guide

Does your Toyota Camry have a problem with one of the door windows? Does it slide down on its own or maybe it won’t go back up all the way? Chances are you either have a window off track, a bad fuse or a dead window regulator. Here are possible solutions to fix it.

Toyota Camry Power Window Failure - Guide

Are your windows not working on your Toyota Camry? Here is a guide on how to fix it.


In order to properly fix the problem, it is important to properly diagnose it. Take some time to really consider what is going on and if you understand the full extent of the problem. Misdiagnosing a problem can lead to additional repair time and money wasted. When you know what the problem is, here are some likely fixes.

Window Off Track

The Toyota Camry windows are a pretty straightforward system. There are tracks on each side of the window that are attached to the door to keep the window in place. If your window slips or falls, look at these tracks to see if any of them are loose.

Over time, the window tracks can get worn down. You can order new tracks or you can use glue or new screws into the door panel to keep the track in place.

Bad Fuse

Another culprit for the window not staying up is a bad fuse. Toyota put a 30A fuse in the fuse box that controls the power windows, power locks and power moonroof. Keep in mind, the fuse controls all three systems. If everything listed isn’t working, then it is a fuse. If it is just the windows, you probably have a bad regulator.

Window Regulator

87-91 camry window regulator 6290L
The power windows are operated by a motor attached to a lever system also known as the window regulator. This pushes the window up and manages the speed it retracts. Over time, this motor can give out through normal wear and tear.

In order to replace the regulator, follow these steps:

  1. Find a replacement part at parts.olathetoyota.com
  2. Next, remove the door panel by locating screws on the interior panel. These can be located in the armrest and behind the speakers. Then, pull carefully on the door panel to release it from clips.
  3. While you remove the door panel, remember to disconnect the door locks. There will be an electrical cable running from inside the door to the door locks.
  4. Next, you will find a thin, plastic barrier protecting the door innards. Carefully peel back this plastic.
  5. Locate the window regulator by matching it up with your new part. If you can’t find it, just look at the bottom of the window and find the pieces that connect to it.
  6. Remove the bolts that keep the regulator in place.
  7. Replace the old regulator with the new one and reverse the steps to put it in.

Replacing the regulator should be a half hour to a full hour job and is pretty easy for a novice to do.

Questions?

 

 

Written by Tim Esterdahl